TOP 3 PROVINCIAL PARKS IN CANADA

2014 Traveler’s Choice Awards

Top 3 Most Visited Provincial Parks in Western / Northern Canada

 Back to 2014 Traveler’s Choice Award Winners

Provincial / Territorial Parks

Canada’s Provincial / Territorial Parks – every province and territory in Canada has some parks which are designated as provincial parks. All are created to protect and preserve, either, our history and/or sensitive eco – systems. Many are home to assorted wildlife, flora and fauna (some endangered).

Canada’s oldest provincial park (est.1893) is the Algonquin Provincial Park located in Ontario, Canada. Since then there have been many parks created in all 13 regions of Canada. Some are landlocked parks while others are marine parks. 

Together,  our provincial and territorial park system has attracted millions of travelers to our country every summer and winter. To many the provincial and territorial parks in Canada are a refuge for adventure, activities, relaxation, education and peace of mind.

The provincial  park system varies. Some parks are not developed at all and are remote and hard to access. While others are developed with a bevy of services like campgrounds, marinas, cabins, yurts, general stores, playgrounds, equipment rentals, museums, showers, change rooms, fish stations, laundromats and a whole lot more.

Below we have posted the TOP 3 MOST POPULAR PROVINCIAL PARKS VISITED on our award winning ehCanadaTravel.com website and blog by OVER 2.1+ MILLION ONLINE TRAVELERS in 2013.

Below are the winners of our 2014 TRAVELER’S CHOICE AWARDS:  

Cathedral Grove Park

Cathedral Grove Provincial Park

1travelers-best-award-1stCathedral Grove Provincial Park,
BC, Canada

Cathedral Grove – MacMillan Provincial Park is located east of the community of Port Alberni, BC on Vancouver Island, Canada. The 157 hectare wilderness park was created to protect the old growth forests within the Coastal Douglas Fir Biogeoclimatic Zone. The trees are massive in MacMillan Park – most of them Douglas Fir and Red Cedar. There are trees in the park that are over 800 years old. One of the oldest Douglas Fir trees in Cathedral Grove is over 9 metres in diameter. (read more)

Kikomun Provincial Park

Koocanusa Lake

1travelers-best-award-2ndKikomun Creek Provincial Park
BC, Canada

Kikomun Creek Provincial Park is a recreation destination, popular for its sandy beaches, lakes and trails, located west of Fernie, BC in the Kootenay region of British Columbia, Canada. The 682 hectare park is home to fields of grasslands and wetlands surrounded by Ponderosa pine and Douglas Fir trees. The park is designed to protect the grassland habitat and wildlife population in the region. A series of trails in the park connect hikers to beaches and lakes including the Koocanusa, Surveyor and Hidden Lakes.. (read more)

coulees-horsethief-canyon

Horsethief Canyon Provincial Park

1travelers-best-award-3rdHorsethief Provincial Park
Alberta, Canada
Horsethief Canyon Provincial Park is a sightseeing and hiking destination located west of the community of Drumheller, Alberta, Canada. It is an area well documented with fossil discoveries of dinosaurs. There have been over 35 dinosaur discoveries recorded in the region uncovering fossils dating as far back as 70 million years ago.  Now… Horsethief Canyon is more of a sightseeing destination providing far-reaching views of the Canadian Badlands. (read more)

Congratulations to this years most popular Provincial / Territorial Parks in Western/Northern Canada
from the “eh Team Brothers” and the ehCanadaTravel.com.

CLAIM YOUR AWARD – from ehCanadaTravel.com

vista2- small2ehCanadaTravel.com (eh Canada Travel & Adventure) is the largest booking, planning and researching tourism and travel website for Western and Northern Canada currently expanding into Eastern and Atlantic Canada. The EH Team Brothers (Co Founders) also author the eh Canada Travel Blog which was recently awarded “A Top Canadian Blogger” by FlightNetwork.com.

2014 Traveler’s Choice Awards – Provincial Parks

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